5 ways we take a sustainable approach to our reed bed work

We understand the crucial role a well-maintained reed bed can play in water treatment. We also acknowledge that reed beds are valuable ecosystems that provide a habitat for various plant and animal species.

That’s why maintaining them requires a sustainable approach, too, to ensure their health and effectiveness while enhancing their environmental performance. Here are five examples of sustainable practices we use to manage and maintain reed beds, which often challenge traditional methods offered within our industry.

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Improving treatment processes through desludging settlement lagoons

Desludging settlement lagoons

Our client

Our client is the Coal Authority.

The location is a mine water treatment scheme in South Yorkshire.

The two settlement lagoons – with an 11,000m3 capacity – form part of the mine water treatment process.

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7 reasons why reed bed maintenance is essential

Reed beds are natural filtration systems crucial for conserving water quality. However, like any other wastewater asset, they must be regularly looked after to do their job correctly.

Unfortunately, reed beds are often neglected until a problem occurs, such as a pollution incident.

Alastair Pentland, Environmental Operations Manager at Oren Environmental, has outlined the seven reasons why routine reed bed maintenance is essential.

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The multifaceted role of a reed bed and why maintenance is key

It’s important to remember that regular maintenance is crucial for any reed bed to work – whether it’s a natural or engineered reed bed. This is because reed beds play a critical role in the water treatment process.

The Oren Environmental team is on a mission to help educate the industry about the importance of taking care of reed beds and the benefits that come from looking after them.

Alastair Pentland, Environmental Operations Manager at Oren Environmental, said:

“I think that because reed beds are situated in the natural environment, they can often be overlooked and their role underestimated. Not only do they prevent water courses from pollution, but they also provide a home to countless plants and species.”

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